APPLE OF MY EYE

ABOUT
Hi, my name is Haley Dubon
I am currently, 23 years old.
I love to : act goofy, laugh and smile.
I mainly listen to heavey metal.
I can sing and play drums.
Take me on an adventure and we will become best friends.

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(Source: nickienichols)

northmagneticpole:

Bunch, 2012-Diane Scherer

northmagneticpole:

Bunch, 2012-Diane Scherer

(Source: mpdrolet)

Reblogged from: iamiandiwishiwerent via posted by: mpdrolet

(Source: silvermoon424)

Reblogged from: fuckyeah1990s via posted by: silvermoon424
Anonymous said: Handsome, humour, well dressed, well spoken, SEXY AS HELL

danielmcbatman:

peutetremavie:

The Kills performing No Wow 2006

peutetremavie:

The Kills performing No Wow 2006

Reblogged from: hellyeahalisonmosshart via posted by: peutetremavie
Requested by - dannyblue2013
Reblogged from: vintage-visuals via posted by: wigglemore
Firing Hitler - watch more funny videos

funnyordie:

Firing Hitler

There are bad hires, and then there’s Hitler.

Reblogged from: funnyordie via posted by: funnyordie
astronomicalwonders:

Supernova Remnant N 63A Menagerie
A violent and chaotic-looking mass of gas and dust is seen in this Hubble Space Telescope image of a nearby supernova remnant. Denoted N 63A, the object is the remains of a massive star that exploded, spewing its gaseous layers out into an already turbulent region.
The supernova remnant is a member of N 63, a star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Visible from the southern hemisphere, the LMC is an irregular galaxy lying 160,000 light-years from our own Milky Way galaxy. The LMC provides excellent examples of active star formation and supernova remnants to be studied with Hubble.
Many of the stars in the immediate vicinity of N 63A are extremely massive. It is estimated that the progenitor of the supernova that produced the remnant seen here was about 50 times more massive than our own Sun. Such a massive star has strong stellar winds that can clear away its ambient medium, forming a wind-blown bubble. The supernova that formed N 63A is thought to have exploded inside the central cavity of such a wind-blown bubble, which was itself embedded in a clumpy portion of the LMC’s interstellar medium.
Credit: NASA/Hubble

astronomicalwonders:

Supernova Remnant N 63A Menagerie

A violent and chaotic-looking mass of gas and dust is seen in this Hubble Space Telescope image of a nearby supernova remnant. Denoted N 63A, the object is the remains of a massive star that exploded, spewing its gaseous layers out into an already turbulent region.

The supernova remnant is a member of N 63, a star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Visible from the southern hemisphere, the LMC is an irregular galaxy lying 160,000 light-years from our own Milky Way galaxy. The LMC provides excellent examples of active star formation and supernova remnants to be studied with Hubble.

Many of the stars in the immediate vicinity of N 63A are extremely massive. It is estimated that the progenitor of the supernova that produced the remnant seen here was about 50 times more massive than our own Sun. Such a massive star has strong stellar winds that can clear away its ambient medium, forming a wind-blown bubble. The supernova that formed N 63A is thought to have exploded inside the central cavity of such a wind-blown bubble, which was itself embedded in a clumpy portion of the LMC’s interstellar medium.

Credit: NASA/Hubble

asylum-art:

Dietmar Voorworld is an artist who takes rocks, pebbles and leaves he finds in nature and turns them into memorable pieces of circular land art.

 

Reblogged from: asylum-art via posted by: asylum-art
elenamorelli:

{ the view from the trail }

elenamorelli:

{ the view from the trail }

— Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go (via booksquoteslove)
mycoolstuffdude:

Star Wars R2-D2 Measuring Cup Set

mycoolstuffdude:

Star Wars R2-D2 Measuring Cup Set

Reblogged from: mycoolstuffdude via posted by: mycoolstuffdude
Reblogged from: broken-cactus via posted by: broken-cactus
science-junkie:

Every Asteroid Discovered Since 1980
From the far, far away to the startlingly close, there have been over 600,000 asteroids identified in the inner solar system since 1980. This visualization tracks them all.
The video is the work of Scott Manley. Manley included the path of the near-by asteroids that have been identified starting 34 years ago and carrying on to this year. The asteroids that cross our own orbit are in red, the ones that just get close are in yellow, and the ones even further out are all in green.
Source: io9.com

science-junkie:

Every Asteroid Discovered Since 1980

From the far, far away to the startlingly close, there have been over 600,000 asteroids identified in the inner solar system since 1980. This visualization tracks them all.

The video is the work of Scott Manley. Manley included the path of the near-by asteroids that have been identified starting 34 years ago and carrying on to this year. The asteroids that cross our own orbit are in red, the ones that just get close are in yellow, and the ones even further out are all in green.

Source: io9.com

Reblogged from: science-junkie via posted by: science-junkie